Part 47 Registration

UAV Registration under 14 CFR Part 47

Registration with the FAA is required for all unmanned aircraft flown in the United States. The vast majority of UAVs are registered online with the FAA are small and the application process is quick, easy, and costs just $5.

Registering a UAV over 55 pounds is not quick and not easy and cannot be completed online. So you may want help to complete the Part 47 Application.

UAV Registration under 14 CFR Part 47

Part 47 Registration is required for Unmanned Aircraft that weigh 55 pounds or more.

UAV Drone

Who Must Register their Large UAV:

Excluding unmanned aircraft owned by the U.S. Armed Forces; all people, companies, and government entities that own a UAV over 55 pounds must be registered in accordance with 14 C.F.R. Part 47 or Part 48.

Registering a New- Aircraft Under Part 47

What is considered a “new” UAV? A new UAV is defined as one that came to the owner essentially new in-the-box from the manufacturer or retailer and has never been registered.  

The UAV owner must provide the following:

  1. A completed Aircraft Registration Application: For an original Aircraft Registration Application, AC Form 8050-1 must be used.

    Applicant is an LLC- When a Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) is the applicant to register a UAV it must provide pertinent information regarding the organization.
  2. A Notarized Affidavit:
    a) Establishes the required description of the UAV providing the following:
    • Full Legal Name of UAV Manufacturer or Builder,
    • UAV Model Designation,
    • UAV Serial Number,
    • Class (Airplane, Airship, Rotorcraft, Glider, Hybrid Lift, Ornithopter),
    • UAV Maximum Takeoff Weight (including all items on board or attached),
    • Number of Engines; Engine Types- Electric, Turbo – Fan/Prop/Shaft/Jet.
  3. Proof of Ownership: The applicant must show ownership of the UAV by providing an aircraft bill of sale, or an equal transfer of ownership document for each change of ownership from the UAV manufacturer, builder, or retail vendor to the owner making application for registration.

    a) Registration in a Foreign Country: The rule 47 applicant must establish that the UAV is not already registered in another country. If the UAV was purchased from a seller located in another, country is considered an import. If the UAV has not been registered anywhere and was purchased new off-the-shelf from the manufacturer or a retail vendor, include a statement that you bought it. If the UAV was registered or operated in another country, then additional steps must be taken to verify that the UAV is eligible for a Part 47 Registration.

    b) Affirmed and Notarized: The Part 47 application must be avowed and signed by the UAS owner.

4. An N-number to be assigned to the registered aircraft.

a) Special N-number– Can be reserved in advance by the UAV owner for this registration, this number will be assigned if it is entered on the forms in the indicated blanks. A special N-number may be requested when filing the application and other documents. Include a letter that lists several N-number choices, and the $10.00 special number fee. The first listed number verified as available will be assigned to the aircraft.

b) Random N-number– A random N-number will be assigned at no cost if the indicated blanks on the registration forms are left empty, or a random number is requested.

5. Registration Fee– The registration fee by check or money order made payable to the Federal Aviation Administration. This fee is waived when the applicant is a Federal, State or local government office, agency or institution.

6. Mail Your Part 47 Application: Mail your completed Part 47 application to the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch.

As you can see, registering a UAV under Part 47 is extremely complicated and time-consuming. If you would like help registering a drone that weighs more than 55 pounds (lbs) then contact drone attorney Clint Dunaway at office@dunawaylg.com or by phone at 480-389-6529.


Registering a Used or Previously Registered UAV Under Part 47:

What is the definition of “used”? A used or previously registered UAV is defined as having been registered or operated as a civil, public, or military aircraft under the laws of the U.S. or another country.

When applying for the new application of a used UAV the application must provide the following information:

  1. A completed Aircraft Registration Application: A completed Part 47 application will include; an original Aircraft Registration Application, AC Form 8050-1.

    When a Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) is an applicant to register a used UAV, it must provide specific information regarding its organization, how management authority is held, and how it meets the definition of U.S. citizen for aircraft registration.
  2. Notarized Affidavit:
    a) Establishes the required description of the UAV providing the following:
    • Full Legal Name of the UAV Manufacturer or Builder
    • UAV Model Designation,
    • UAV Serial Number,
    • Class (Airplane, Airship, Rotorcraft, Glider, Hybrid Lift, Ornithopter),
    • UAV Maximum Takeoff Weight (including all items on board or attached),
    • Number of Engines,
    • Engine Type (Electric, Turbo – Fan/Prop/Shaft/Jet).

b) Establishes the ownership of the UAV by the applicant:

4.    Proof of Ownership: Ownership may be established by filing, with the affidavit, an aircraft bill of sale, or an equal transfer of ownership document for each change in ownership from the last U.S. registered, foreign, or military owner through any intervening owners to the owner making application for registration.

If a bill of sale or other transfer document is unobtainable, there are other options for showing the transfer of ownership.

a) Establishes that the UAV isn’t registered in another country.

When a used UAV is purchased from a seller located in another country, it is considered an import. This requires a statement from the Civil Aviation Authority of the exporting country confirming their registration for this UAV or UAV has ended or that a registration was never issued in that country.

b) Includes the following statement above the signatures,

“I affirm the information and statements provided herein are correct, the aircraft is not registered under the laws of any foreign country, and I am the owner.”

5.   Obtain an N-number– An N-number to be assigned to the used UAV being registered.

When a U.S. used or registered UAV or UAV is sold to another U.S. owner, it already has an assigned N-number. The new owner should show the assigned N-number in the indicated blanks on the application and bill of sale forms. The aircraft will then be registered and a registration certificate issued using this N-number.

If a special N-number was reserved or is desired for use on this UAV or UAV, include a letter requesting the assignment of the desired N-number. Use the special N-number link above for more information about requesting or changing N-numbers.

A random N-number will be assigned at no cost to an unregistered import or former military aircraft if the indicated blanks on the registration forms are left empty, or a random number is requested.

6.    Registration Fee– The Part 47 registration fee must be paid check or money order to the Federal Aviation Administration. Multiple fees may be consolidated into a single payment. Registration and N-number fees are waived when the applicant is a Federal, State or local government office, agency or institution.

7.    Mail Your Application– Send your Registration documents to the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch.

As you can see, registering a UAV under Part 47 is extremely complicated and time-consuming. If you would like help registering a drone that weighs more than 55 pounds (lbs) then contact drone attorney Clint Dunaway at office@dunawaylg.com or by phone at 480-389-6529.

Selling/Purchasing a Used or Previously Registered UAV:

  • Selling a Used or previously registered UAV: The seller should execute a bill of sale transferring all or a specific portion of their right, title and interest in the UAV to the purchaser. Provide the original signed bill of sale to the purchaser. Use the aircraft description shown on the registration certificate or the Search Aircraft Registration Information website to correctly describe the UAV on the bill of sale.
  • Retaining Important Documents– When selling a UAV under Part 47, the seller should retain their Certificate of Aircraft Registration, AC Form 8050-3, complete the applicable items on the reverse side, and return it to the FAA.
  • Submitting Part 47 Documents– The purchaser should forward the bill of sale with the seller’s original signature, a completed Aircraft Registration Application, AC Form 8050-1, and registration fee to the FAA.

As you can see, registering a UAV under Part 47 is extremely complicated and time-consuming. If you would like help registering a drone that weighs more than 55 pounds (lbs) then contact drone attorney Clint Dunaway at office@dunawaylg.com or by phone at 480-389-6529.

FAA Drone Registration

This blogpost will clearly explain the process of how to register your drone with the Federal Aviation Association. The FAA has actually made the process of registering drone a rather smooth and simple process.

Why is Drone Registration Necessary?

Plain and simple the FAA wants drones registered to increase the safety of people both in the air and on the ground. With more than 1 million drones registered with the FAA they have their hands full trying to keep people safe.

“Registration is all about safety,” says FAA spokesperson Jim Peters. “It provides us with a key opportunity to educate the new generation of airspace users that as soon as they start flying outside, they’re pilots. There are safety implications to how they fly, and there are rules and regulations they must follow. When necessary, registration will help us track down people who operate unsafely.”

Drone Pilots Will be Held Accountable for their Actions

There are countless examples of people flying their drones dangerously close to other aircraft and restricted areas. Drones have interfered with:

  • Commercial airplanes,
  • Planes and helicopters in the process of fighting wildfires.
  • One drone even landed on the lawn of the White House.

The FAA sees the registration process as an important stepping-stone to a clear, long-term policy making drones safer for everyone.

What are the Penalties for NOT Registering a Drone? 

It’s difficult for the FAA to enforce these penalties but the fines are steep. 

  • Civil penalties can reach $27,500!
  • Criminal penalties can cost you as much as $250,000 and three years in prison!

So Who Needs to Register their Drone?

Registering once gives recreational pilots a registration number, akin to a driver’s license number. The recreation drone registration number applies to any drone that you may own and is good for three years. After the registration number expires then you will simply go through the registration process again.

When you buy another drone you’re not required to go through the registration process again because the registration number is for the person and not the drone itself. 

Who Does NOT Need to Register their Drone?

  • If your drone weighs less than 0.55 pounds.
  • If you’re only going to fly your drone indoors.
  • If your drone weighs more than 55 pounds you’ll go through a different registration process.
  • If you’re using your drone for commercial purposes—which means you’re using your drone to make money then you need to go through a different more cumbersome registration process.

How to Register Your Drone

You’ll register your drone through the FAA’s website at faadronezone.faa.gov. The FAA website makes the registration process very simple.

You’ll also get a registration certificate emailed to you, which you’ll need to print out (or keep handy on your mobile device) and have with you when flying. Once your drone is officially registered you are cleared for takeoff!

Placing the Registration Number on Your Drone

You must then place the registration number on the Exterior of your Drone. It must be visible on the exterior of the drone without having to remove any parts to view the registration number.

If you have questions about FAA registration compliance then contact the Dunaway Law Group at 480-389-6529 or send us a message HERE.